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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New to this forum etc.

My Aviator GMT has been sent for repair at the manufacturer in Switzerland.

I chose it for, well, I am an aviator, for its clean and readable design, for its superior lume, but also because Ball Watch claim it is 5000 Gs resistant.

I was very happy with is for the last 3 years or so, until it started stopping. Since it was on my wrist 24/7 it should not have happened.So I sent it for repairs at the manufacturers'.

Today I received the invoice, which says, quote: "Time and accuracy adjustment , water resistance controlled*+ Dial changed".

Wait a moment - dial changed? It wasn't broken.

I am happy to inform the forum members that the Ball Watch team in Switzerland is exceptionally friendly and helpful. I inquired with them about the dial and was told, quote: "the “feet” of the dial back are broken or “unclinched”. They are little parts to be clinched on the movement, and they were not well clinched any more". Evidently, if the clinches don't clinch, the dial itself needs to be replaced.

The watch has been on my wrist since purchase, and it has never sustained more than the occasional bang against stationary objects while walking. Hardly an 5000 Gs event.

This can only mean one of two things: either the Ball Watch claim of 5000 Gs resistance is unsubstantiated, or I got myself a lemon. Either option is quite disappointing.

Has any of the Forum members encountered similar fragility with his Balls (yeah, pun intended)?

Thx all
 

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Or they get inherently damaged during service. I always got upset when the mechanic charged me for bolts/studs he broke when working on my car, but that's how it is.

This does help us with a major question - how much was the dial replacement? When the tritium "wears out" we will all owe that much to restore the lume
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks tc

Of course there's no way to prove if it broke during service; I assume, however, that if an automatic watch stops, there could be a mechanical reason such as a shock that broke the clinches between dial and movement, and the dial which lost its correct seating applied pressure on the delicate second hand and stopped it. That's just an assumption of course.

The new dial will cost me 72 Swiss Francs, about USD 77. No big deal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks again tc, but I must say that I am not entirely convinced.

Here's what Wikipedia has to say on shock resistance in watches: "The International Organization for Standardization issued a standard for shock resistant watches, which many countries have adopted. ISO 1413 Horology—Shock-resistant watches specifies the minimum requirements and describes the corresponding method of test. It is intended to allow homologation tests rather than the individual control of all watches of a production batch. It is based on the simulation of the shock received by a watch on falling accidentally from a height of 1 m on to a horizontal hardwood surface.
In practice shock resistance is generally tested by applying two shocks (one on the 9 o'clock side, and one to the crystal and perpendicular to the face). The shock is usually delivered by a hard plastic hammer mounted as a pendulum, so as to deliver a measured amount of energy, specifically, a 3 kg hammer with an impact velocity of 4.43 m/s. The watch must keep its accuracy to +/- 60 seconds/day as measured before the test."

That means that the test greatly exceeds the minimum standard of a 1 meter fall, because for the same impact velocity they employ a 3kg hammer - that's about 3000 times the impact which a 100gr watch experiences when falling from 1m. Ball says 5000G, so they probably employ a 5kg hammer - that's like dropping the watch from 50m, or a 17 story building. And I'm pretty sure my watch has never experienced such an impact.

Is my reasoning here flawed?
 

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I am no scientist or mathematician, but it is my understanding that G force is the measurement of speed. I do not know how they relate it to the shock of a watch dropping. Factors like what it drops on to change the equation don't they? Someone must know, I am going to ask the smart people I know:001_unsure:
Mike
 

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Mike,

It can be a measurement of speed while in motion, or in 'an instant', such as a hit. Because the force of the hit carries energy due to it's acceleration (or deceleration).

Personally I think the Ball 5000g hype is nothing but that, hype and creative marketing by Ball. it's nothing different than many other watch standards. Most 'good' watches nowadays are shock resistant (including all dive watches as part of dive rating certification). The ISO 1413 standard (which is 5,000G) is:

Delivered by a hard plastic hammer mounted as a pendulum, so as to deliver a measured amount of energy, specifically, a 3 kg hammer with an impact velocity of 4.43 m/s. The watch must keep its accuracy to +/- 60 seconds/day as measured before the test.

OK, so do the math and what all that says is the watch will be struck on the 9 side and crystal side by a plastic hammer weighing 6.6 pounds and traveling 3.3 feet at 9.96 MPH, which is equivalent to 5,000 g. To put this into everyday life usage, this is about the same energy delivered by a typical golf swing. Hardly protection from a 'mega-impact' IMO.

So why is it used? Just my opinion, but most people interpret G's via the force of a mechanical vehicle (plane or car usually) and know the human body can only take G forces in small amounts. After all, most fighter pilots will gray or black out with sustained G's over 9 or 10 G's. If these highly fit, strong and trained individuals can only take 10 or so G's, a watch rated to 5,000 must be able to stop Armageddon itself. The reality is the measurement of G can't be "apples to apples" for a mechanical item vs. a human one. The human element is limited due to the requirement to keep blood moving thru the body and into the brain & organs. A watch (or any other 'thing') doesn't have that limitation. Just to give another comparison, a bat hitting a baseball at 90mph has about 13,000g's at impact. And that's a moving object hitting another moving object, not one moving object hitting a stationary object (such as the floor).

But again, since most people only see G's as a relation to acceleration in cars or planes, they think 10 or 15 G's is a lot, so 5,000 must be immense. But in reality it's a force you encounter often in life. I'd guess hitting your watch on your wrist into a door-frame is a couple thousand G's as well.

To the OP. It may seem like a lot, but it's not unlikely you've encountered 5,000g's on your watch. You way you wear it ever day, so it is possible. If you play golf or have ever hit your wrist hard into a door-frame, pole or corner, it's very possible you've gotten close to these forces and possibly even exceeded them. I'm not saying you actually have, and it's not an everyday occurrence, but it is very possible if it's been worn in a lot of situations or activities.
 

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Mike,

It can be a measurement of speed while in motion, or in 'an instant', such as a hit. Because the force of the hit carries energy due to it's acceleration (or deceleration).

Personally I think the Ball 5000g hype is nothing but that, hype and creative marketing by Ball. it's nothing different than many other watch standards. Most 'good' watches nowadays are shock resistant (including all dive watches as part of dive rating certification). The ISO 1413 standard (which is 5,000G) is:

Delivered by a hard plastic hammer mounted as a pendulum, so as to deliver a measured amount of energy, specifically, a 3 kg hammer with an impact velocity of 4.43 m/s. The watch must keep its accuracy to +/- 60 seconds/day as measured before the test.

OK, so do the math and what all that says is the watch will be struck on the 9 side and crystal side by a plastic hammer weighing 6.6 pounds and traveling 3.3 feet at 9.96 MPH, which is equivalent to 5,000 g. To put this into everyday life usage, this is about the same energy delivered by a typical golf swing. Hardly protection from a 'mega-impact' IMO.

So why is it used? Just my opinion, but most people interpret G's via the force of a mechanical vehicle (plane or car usually) and know the human body can only take G forces in small amounts. After all, most fighter pilots will gray or black out with sustained G's over 9 or 10 G's. If these highly fit, strong and trained individuals can only take 10 or so G's, a watch rated to 5,000 must be able to stop Armageddon itself. The reality is the measurement of G can't be "apples to apples" for a mechanical item vs. a human one. The human element is limited due to the requirement to keep blood moving thru the body and into the brain & organs. A watch (or any other 'thing') doesn't have that limitation. Just to give another comparison, a bat hitting a baseball at 90mph has about 13,000g's at impact. And that's a moving object hitting another moving object, not one moving object hitting a stationary object (such as the floor).

But again, since most people only see G's as a relation to acceleration in cars or planes, they think 10 or 15 G's is a lot, so 5,000 must be immense. But in reality it's a force you encounter often in life. I'd guess hitting your watch on your wrist into a door-frame is a couple thousand G's as well.

To the OP. It may seem like a lot, but it's not unlikely you've encountered 5,000g's on your watch. You way you wear it ever day, so it is possible. If you play golf or have ever hit your wrist hard into a door-frame, pole or corner, it's very possible you've gotten close to these forces and possibly even exceeded them. I'm not saying you actually have, and it's not an everyday occurrence, but it is very possible if it's been worn in a lot of situations or activities.
Thank You!!! That makes perfect sense to me.
Mike
 

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G is force per time. So short durations (like the impact of a watch on a floor or the bat hitting the ball) result in a large "g" number, while large forces over a long period of time (fighter pilot maneuver) result in a lower "g" number
 

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My four year old rare, original first generation Night Train that I was lucky enough to locate and purchase from Mike at Vera's has been my everyday wear watch, and it has also lost its power reserve. I also purchased a first generation 43mm Fireman the following year from Mike and it still seems to be doing well with its power reserve.

So I think that it's just time for servicing and will probably have it looked at here locally since the warranty has expired.
 
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