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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If any member has knowledge of this particular watch this would be help. The watch was presented as a 35th Anniversary for tenure at a long defunct business where I've only know my Grandfather was one of the top executives.

From what's learned and remembered being said among family, this was gifted during the war in 1943 at a time of supporting wartime production. There apparently were only Hamiton Military Watches produced during this time and some civilian which included their Military movement apparatuses. This watch has nothing similar to what's pictured inside another thread on this forum. Am curious about the 'Model A' expanse.

Has not been worn in over 70 years. Leather watchband is likely original. No serial no. and no case however. Is fully functional and entirely accurate. Thanks for any help

Watch Product Clock Rectangle Sleeve
Watch Brown Wood Analog watch Clock
Brown Watch Analog watch Wood Clock
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Welcome to WTF. What is the gold content? There will be a serial number on the movement so we'll need to see a pic of the movement and the inside of the case back. Case back should be easy to pop off.
Thank You for the reply - unsure the type of Gold. If guessing, it's 14k. The Case is a very snug fit and aside from popping the entire assembly from beneath the bezel (from the rear) it looks far to delicate for me to just be prodding at with some tools I use with my Bicycles :rolleyes:.

FWIW - the watch would have to be the very latest of the 1930's if not early 1940. Only having read and learned online that Hamilton had ceased normal production during wartime had me wondering what the origin would be. There's similar overall size though the numeric design and styling over the bezel are unmatched. Will likely try to have some local appointments scheduled with watchmakers in my local area.
 

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Mel, welcome to WTF!
Liquid Font Drink Macro photography Event

Your watch's model was called the DONALD and debuted in the 1941 salesman's catalog. It's availability was remarkably long-lived. While most models got replaced after only a few years, the Donald remained listed until 1952 (except for the war years 1942-1945). The case was indeed 14 karat gold (rather than saying solid gold, Hamilton said "natural gold". Solid 18-karat gold was used for the applied numerals on the dial. It used the 982M movement. The "M" stood for Medallion for a higher grade of movement than their standard grade Hamilton would soon present the 770 as their top-of-the-line movement. In 1941, the MSRP of a donald was $96.00 and had increased to $110.00 by 1952.

To answer the second part of your post: Much like Rolex has the Tudor and Cellini lines of models, Hamilton in 1953 introduced ILLINOIS as their subsidiary brand name. And just so customers wouldn't confuse the Hamilton model names with the Illinois models, they chose to use letters instead of names.
Ladies had models A and B in the Golden Treasure, Kimberly, and Series and Career Girl,
Models A, B, and C in the Coquette Series
Models A, B, C, and D in the Lady Gay Series.
For men, Illinois had the Debonair Series models A,B,C,D and E
The Topper Series A and B
and A, B, and C in Illinois' automatic movement watches.
Generally speaking, The Illinois brand sold for close to 66% to 75% the cost of a ''normal'' Hamilton.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank You for so much information CometHunter. This particular watch has 'Stanley' corporate logo from what was Stanley Works in New Britain CT pressed into the back, along with dates of tenure at the time plus a full name. Stanley acquired the Company about a decade later.

I'm not about to try and separate the back from the movement assembly. Again, is a very snug fit and likely has never been apart. I'm confident in the identification that's been given here, thanks.
 

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If it has been 70+/- years since it has been worn, the interior lubricants have dried up many, many years ago. A Cleaning and oiling service should be done ASAP for such a great heirloom. And you can ask the watchmaker to let you see the movement - a great time to take a snapshot of it.
Cheers and good luck!
 
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