Questionable "Restoration" question
 

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Thread: Questionable "Restoration" question

  1. #1
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    So, I recently married a very amazing woman with a rich family history. She from her grandfather inherited a vintage 1950's Seamaster watch which she passed along to me. To our surprise after being in a box for 20-30 years it still worked (talk about craftsmanship!!) One day i was winding it and the crown fell off in my hand which freaked me out so I got on the official Omega website and rushed to the only place listed. Jared the Gallarea of Jewelry and had it sent off. I thought I paid for a full restoration 650 USD. When I finally got it back the crown didn't have the official Omega stamp like the previous one had and was no longer Waterproof. In fact it is not even water resistant. I also thought I would get a certificate of authenticity and a copy of the watchmakers book that had a little history on the piece. Can anyone tell me first a bit of its history ( I am dieing to know), if I have been ripped off and does the crown \ waterproof depreciate the value?

    the s\n is 2849-3SC2849-3SC (2).jpg2849-3SC.JPG

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    A better shot of the dial would help ! As for the " restoration " , do you have a detailed reciept of what was done ?
    I don't understand why a generic crown was used , did you lose the original when it unscrewed?
    I don't know what you mean by a "watchmaker's book"?

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    The watch makers book thing is something I thought I had seen on Omega website but, not important. I have done all sorts of research on Vintage Omega watches and may have imagined it due to absolute overload.

    The crown however I sent with the watch and was a little heartbroken when it did not bear the Omega seal upon return. I then saw on this site that someone had mentioned that Omega does not use generic parts. That raised some concerns as well as the waterproof issue.

    I do not have a receipt. I left it with the store to do inquiries about my concerns.

    here is however another pic of the dial:
    dial.jpg
    Last edited by mlbarn; 04-01-2011 at 01:29 PM.

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    I can't comment on what was or wasn't done, but that is definitely a refinished dial.

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    You should have seen it before. It is a huge improvement and I am honored to be wearing such a piece of not only her family history but a piece of history in general. I just want to do it justice and keep it running for my children and God willing their children.

    I have called the jewelry store and they are doing some inquiries. That being said they also stated that the service center may have had a hard time finding original parts so just put one on that they could find and would fit, even though I sent the original in with it.

    I noticed the difference right off the bat and voiced my concern when I picked it up I then asked for the original to be returned to me but, they then said that they don't keep the "scraps" which made me skeptical about the integrity of the repairs.

    I would love to have it waterproof again. Otherwise I foresee problems with the longevity of the watch.
    Last edited by mlbarn; 04-01-2011 at 04:00 PM. Reason: sentence structure

  6. #6

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    I think this is what you mean by watchmaker's book

    OMEGA Watches: Extract of the Archives

    You can order an extract from their archives relative to a given watch. That's probably the best bet when it comes to learning the history of the watch.

    The OMEGA Archive link makes it possible for all owners of OMEGA watches made before 2000 to place an order online for an Extract of the Archives relevant to their watch.

    This service costs CHF 75.00 or the equivalent in local currency.

    The Extract of the Archives is not a Certificate of Authenticity and does not guarantee the authenticity of a watch or its component parts. The Extract of the Archives contains detailed information from our archives which relates to your watch and how it left our facilities in Bienne, as well as the exact production date of the watch.

    OMEGA Watches: Extract of the Archives

    A somewhat enhanced picture below:

    OMEGA Vintage Watches | OMEGA Vintage Watches

    More:

    Services

    Looking after your OMEGA Vintage watch



    A vintage watch should be serviced at least once every three to four years; this replaces the old oils with new and removes any dirt that will affect the performance of the watch. Make sure that you use an authorised OMEGA Vintage Service representative.

    Do not wind your watch whilst it is still on your wrist, this can cause the winding stem to bend or break. Always take off your watch first.

    Remember, a vintage watch is a piece of history; if it is respected as such it will repay its owner with untold years of reliable timekeeping.

    Other useful information

    To ensure that an OMEGA watch provides excellent service for many years to come owners (and potential owners) are kindly asked to follow these guidelines as well:



    MAGNETIC FIELDS: placing a watch on or near equipment which generates powerful magnetic fields should be avoided (unusual examples include loudspeakers, clock radios, and the seal around refrigerator and freezer doors).

    SHOCKS: every effort should be made to avoid any shock, thermal or otherwise.

    SCREW-IN CROWN: the crown should be screwed in carefully to prevent water from entering the mechanism.

    NON SCREW-IN CROWN: the crown should be pushed back into the neutral position to prevent water from entering the mechanism.

    CLEANING: metal bracelets and cases should be cleaned gently with a dry soft cloth.

    CHEMICAL PRODUCTS: direct contact with solvents, detergents, perfumes, cosmetics etc. should be avoided as they may damage the bracelet, case or gaskets.

    TEMPERATURE: exposure to extreme temperatures (greater than 60°C/140°F and less than 0°C/32°F) or extreme temperature fluctuations should be avoided.

    WATER RESISTANCE: this cannot be permanently guaranteed for any timepiece, and can be affected by many factors including aging of gaskets or an accidental shock to the crown. We recommend against wearing a vintage timepiece in water but if any watch is worn in water (at the owner’s risk) we recommend that it be checked at least once a year.

    OMEGA Vintage Watches | OMEGA Vintage Watches
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    Last edited by GradyPhilpott; 04-02-2011 at 12:38 AM.
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    If you paid $650 for a service and it leaks and didn't get your "scraps" back,

    I would be talking to my lawyer about getting robbed! JMHO

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    I have had several vintage Omega watches serviced, one sent back to Switzerland, and in all cases, the crown was signed. Never have non-Omega parts been used and in all cases, I receive the replaced parts back with the watch. You should be able to find out where the watch was sent and confirm with that Omega shop what was done. In order to do this, you will need the movement serial number found stamped on the movement and written on the repair invoice.

    Good Luck and enjoy your vintage Omega!!
    Omega Speedmaster 50th
    Omega PO 2901.50.37
    Omega SMP 2220.80,
    Omega SMP 2551.80,
    Omega Constellation Double Eagle 1203.30,
    Omega Geneve 1968,
    Omega Seamaster 600 1966,
    Omega 1962,
    Omega Seamaster 1969,
    Seiko Auto Relay SMA003,
    Seiko Monster Diver Kinetic SKA289P1,
    Seiko Diver Automatic SKX007,
    Eagle Star 200M

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    did the crown look something like the one on this?


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    Check the crystal. If you look very closely you should be able to see an omega symbol etched in the crystal dead center. If no symbol and no signed crown I'd say you were screwed and the watch was not serviced by an omega center. And if I'm not mistaken omega service will provide you with a detail service quote before work commences. Lots of strange things going on here.
    Valuations given by me on this or any forum are my opinions and do not constitute certified appraisals. They are not legally binding to myself, my spouse or my heirs. I am not a watch appraiser.

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