Does anyone know how to take good lume shots?
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Thread: Does anyone know how to take good lume shots?

  1. #1
    WTF Veteran the black duck 87's Avatar
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    Default Does anyone know how to take good lume shots?

    I've seen great lume shots from alot of members. Can anyone tell me how to do it. I mean explain it like i'm 8 'cause I'm no photographer.
    I'm using a digital camera. Heck I'd like to take nicer wrist shots while I'm at it.

    Any help would be great.

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    WTF Veteran Steve's Avatar


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    Quote Originally Posted by the black duck 87 View Post
    I've seen great lume shots from alot of members. Can anyone tell me how to do it. I mean explain it like i'm 8 'cause I'm no photographer.
    I'm using a digital camera. Heck I'd like to take nicer wrist shots while I'm at it.

    Any help would be great.
    What kind of camera are you using?
    You would be amazed at how often "What if?" works...

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    WTF Veteran the black duck 87's Avatar
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    Sony MVC-CD200 2.1 mega pixel

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    WTF Veteran Steve's Avatar


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    Well, the first thing you need is a tripod.

    I'm not familiar with that camera, but you'll want an extended exposure time. This shot was, if I recall, six seconds long:



    Along with a tripod, if your camera allows for it, you'll want a remote shutter release.

    Any vibration on a long shot can kill the shot; nobody likes blur.

    If you can adjust the ISO, keep that low; I shoot at 100 or 200, and set the aperture to nothing less than f8. This allows everything in the photo to be in focus...
    You would be amazed at how often "What if?" works...

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    Default alternative to a remote shutter release...

    A good alternative to a remote shutter release is a self-timer. Many digital cameras allow you to set a time delay between pressing the button and the shutter release. These are ostensibly so that you can put the camera on a tripod, trip the shutter, and run around to get into the picture. The reason to use a remote shutter release is to avoid the camera shake that is caused when you press the shutter release button on the camera. Low light shots require long exposure times. Camera shake is probably the most important source of blurry photos in low light, even with a tripod. I have even used a three second timer to improve photo sharpness when hand-holding a camera. You press the button normally, but by the time the shutter releases, the motion caused by pressing the button is gone. Many times a digital camera will allow you to adjust the timer delay time.

    Cheers!

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